Fact or Fiction


Since the first day that this breed landed on US soil, there has been a variety of information or
misinformation circulating. Some of it is factual, and some of it is not. Here, we will try to sort out some
of the points that may lead some people to be confused and mislead about this wonderful breed we call
the Biewer or “Biewer a la Pom Pon”. This breed has been renamed by some as, the Biewer Terrier.
Are the Biewers AKC accepted?
• No, the AKC has yet to accept the Biewer, as a breed that they recognize. (This also applies to Biewer a
la Pom Pon, or "Biewer Terrier"). The following is a list of the FSS recognized breeds. http://www.akc.
org/breeds/fss_breeds.cfm
In order to be AKC recognized a breed has to be first admitted into the FSS department, to be evaluated
over a number of years. It has been circulated by some that AKC acceptance is "just down the road". The
truth is it will be YEARS before the Biewer breed has shown its stability enough for the AKC to support
full acceptance. If you have any questions about what is happening please contact the AKC, they will
always be able to help.
http://www.akc.org/breeds/fss_breeds.cfm
Which German Registries are accepted by AKC
• One of the many questions asked of us is what German registries that register the Biewer are accepted
by the AKC? In fact, the answer is none. The following link is a list of the ONLY registries that AKC
accepts. There isn’t one on this list that registers the Biewer.
http://www.akc.org/rules/special_registry_services.cfm.
• The rumor that the AKC does not accept a specific German Registry, the IBC, is in itself true. At the
same time, it does not accept ANY other registry from Germany or anywhere else for that matter that
registers the Biewer. This may change in the future, we shall see!
Misconceptions about various Registries

• There are numerous registries throughout Germany, the USA and Canada that register the Biewer. Each
and every one of them uses guidelines that they have developed to their own specifications. There are
rumors that some of the German registries are not well accepted here in the USA. Some of the American
Registries have chosen not to accept any American born Biewer that holds a German Registry. The only
registry that the BBCA can guarantee is the BBIR, Biewer Breed International Registry, as they still do
accept the German Registries in order not to close their studbooks on various lines that are still being
imported from Germany.
UCI/NAKC vs. UCI e.V./IABCA

• For those interested in showing, there has been confusion concerning what show venues are supportive
of this breed and its standard. There are two distinct splits among the main show venues for this breed.
One thing to remember is that the initials, UCI are widely used in Germany and they are all NOT the same
club.
The first USA/Canada show venue is the NAKC which is going by the United Kennel Clubs International
standard. http://www.raritiesinc.ca/
http://www.u-c-i.de/index.shtml
This was the original standard that the breed was shown under when it first was shown in 2004 and is still
being used today.
The BBCA is proud to be a member of the United Kennel Club International for the past 3 years and the
only Biewer club to hold this honor.
The second USA/Canada show venue is the IABCA. http://www.iabca.com . The IABCA has changed
their show standard to reflect a different “type” of Biewer, the Biewer Terrier. They are using a new
standard that has been approved in the past few months by the United Cynologie International, e.V.,
http://www.uci-ev.de/ This standard differs from the original standard of the Breed on various aspects.
Neither one of these UCI’s holds any more importance or superiority over another although, one is
definitely more global and well known and that is the United Kennel Clubs International.

Biewer or Biewer a la Pom-Pon vs. Biewer Terrier?

• The big question, and one that confuses many people is this… “Are all of the different names for the
Biewer considered the same breed?” The answer to this is YES. The “Biewer” and “Biewer a la Pom-Pon”
have been used interchangeably. It is said that dropping the word Yorkshire from the name Biewer
Yorkshire a la Pom Pon is necessary to obtain AKC/FSS status.

The BBCA, BBCC and BBSA board members believe in our Breed Order and Code of Ethics in only
allowing pure Biewer to Biewer breeding, so it was agreed upon to drop the Yorkshire name as to not
cause confusion regarding the Breed in relation to the Yorkshire Terrier. We have treated the Biewer
Breed as its OWN breed since the club’s inception.

The “Biewer Terrier” is a new addition into the "name" pool. Those that have chosen to call their dogs
by this name have claimed that they are different. In what aspects we ask? We are not sure! They are
derived from the same gene pool as the Biewer a la Pom-Pon and all have been breed from the same dogs
that had been imported from Germany years ago. If they have added different breeds into the Biewer
Terrier lines, that remains to be seen.
The Reasoning behind this is…
The AKC only considers adding new breeds to the FSS® or its registry upon request. The breed must be
recognized by an acceptable foreign or domestic registry.

The FSS® is not open to "rare" breeds that are a variation of an AKC-registered breed or the result of a
combination of two AKC-recognized breeds. This includes and is not limited to differences such as size
(over and under), coat type, coat colors, and disqualifications of coat colors and/or types that are from
Conformation Events by AKC breed standards.
In order to be admitted into the FSS the Biewer would have to be proven that it was a mixed breed not a
piebald gene occurrence as stated by Mr. Biewer. How the piebald gene got entered into the pool of
genetic makeup up the Biewer remains a mystery. The original dogs imported to the Biewers (which
produced the first tri colored offspring) came from the Streamglen Kennel in England. If any other
breeds were in the genetic makeup of the dog it is unknown as DNA was not readily available or often
used in Germany in 1989.
Since Mr. Biewer’s Biewer breed originated from the Yorkshire Terrier it would never be allowed in the
AKC under these circumstances. One particular club is making the claim that the breed they refer to as
“Biewer Terrier" is of mixed breed heritage... as per the testing they have obtained through the MARS
Corp. The testing being used at MARS Corp. is for mixed breed heritage testing and is not recommended
for purebred dogs.

The following are statements regarding Mars Testing that were obtained from the Mar’s website.
Here is a link to that page as well… http://www.wisdompanel.com/faq.html

Can you determine breed purity?
Wisdom Panel™ Insights test analyzes over 300 genetic markers to determine the ancestral breed
composition of a mixed-breed dog. Within this panel, there are almost no markers which are absolutely
specific to one breed. Each breed will have a combination of markers within the panel that represent the
breed. Within a mixed-breed dog, depending on the heritage of the breeds, not all of those markers may
be passed down through the generations to appear in the genetic make-up of the dog that is tested. For
example, on average, you would only expect 25% of the breed markers from a Grandparent to be passed
down to the current dog. Thus, the way the test works is to use a best-fit model that is selected on the
basis of the highest probability for each breed depending upon the analysis of markers that are found in
the current dog. The final report is generated depending on the highest probability breeds found with a
lower limit cut-off to ensure that the false positive reports are reduced to a minimum.
The relationship between the markers and breeds is unfortunately proprietary information as it forms the
basis of the test and is therefore not publicized. Where pure breed dogs are concerned, most often the
report generated by the test will simply indicate the pure strain of the breed in question as no other
markers will be found at a high enough confidence level to generate a result. However, although our
sample base covers 170+ breeds and comprises more than 8,700 samples in total, there are several cases in
which pure breed dogs may not be detected as purebred by Wisdom Panel Insights test.
First, if the dog in question is not or was not bred within the continental US, even if it is an example of an
AKC recognized breed, then we may not pick up the breed signature as the distinctive markers that
identify the breed may vary greatly in foreign lines. Secondly, if there has been a very isolated breeding
line for the pure breed, then we may not have enough coverage of that breed's gene pool to identify the
dog as purebred. For these reasons, we do not advertise or recommend the use of Wisdom Panel Insights
as a test for confirming the purity of a purebred dog. This is due to the fact that Wisdom Panel Insights is
designed to find multiple breeds in an analysis, under the assumption that the dog it is testing has more
than one breed in its mix. A test to determine breed purity would need to be designed for that purpose
and its accuracy validated.

Do you identify UKC breeds with the Wisdom Panel™ Insights test?

In the development of Wisdom Panel Insights, we have genotyped more than 13,000 dogs. There are more
than 8,700 purebred dogs in our database that our computer algorithm uses to detect breeds in a tested
dog's genetic background. Most of these dogs were registered with either the American Kennel Club
(AKC) or UK Kennel Club (UKC). Wisdom Panel Insights test is not intended to determine whether a
dog is a purebred member of a breed, and because of this, the computer algorithm we use is optimized to
search for combinations of breeds present in a mixed-breed dog. This may result in minor inaccuracies if
the test is used to determine the purebred nature of a dog, and we do not recommend the use of the test
for this purpose.

Will Wisdom Panel™ Insights mixed-breed analysis test for purebred dogs?

• No. Mars Veterinary’s current focus is the development of a state-of-the-art mixed-breed genetic
identification test for dogs. Mars Veterinary has completed over 19 million genetic marker analyses and
has typed over 13,000 dogs from the American Kennel Club (AKC) registered purebred dogs as well as
mixed-breed dogs. This process gave Mars Veterinary the ability to distinguish between a purebred and a
mixed-breed dog as well as the capability of identifying breeds present within a mixed-breed dog.
However, in order to identify a dog as an official or registered purebred, the DNA collection, analysis
and development of the test would be much different. A purebred is defined as a canine that is bred from
members of a specific or registered breed over many generations. Validation of purebreds and what
constitutes a purebred is a job for kennel clubs such as the American Kennel Club (AKC).
Biewers imported to the USA are a FOREIGN breed and by the MARS Corp. own admission their results
are NOT to be considered accurate in reference to foreign bloodlines.
If the dog in question is not or was
not bred within the continental US from dogs of US origin and influence, even if it is an example of an
AKC recognized breed, then we may not pick up the breed signature as the distinctive markers that
identify the breed may vary greatly in foreign lines.

Secondly, if there has been a very isolated breeding line for the pure breed, then we may not have enough
coverage of that breed's gene pool to identify the dog as purebred. We know that the Biewers were very
heavily linebred. For these reasons, we do not advertise or recommend the use of Wisdom Panel Insights
as a test for confirming the purity of a purebred dog.
This is due to the fact that Wisdom Panel Insights is designed to find multiple breeds in an analysis,
under the assumption that the dog being tested has more than one breed in its genetic makeup. A test to
determine breed purity would need to be designed for that purpose and its accuracy validated.

• The only constant in all of this is that the Biewer Breed Club of America has ONLY bred Biewer to
Biewer since the clubs inception and will do nothing less in the future. Some clubs have since chosen to
follow OUR lead regarding this type of breeding.
Biewer Parent Club

• Contrary to many posted references to a Parent Club for the Biewer, there is NOT an AKC National
Biewer Club at this time, as they are not AKC accepted. There are several clubs with different views on
the future of the breed. It is a national breed club's responsibility to preserve, protect and promote the
breed and this responsibility should not be taken lightly. The parent club must educate the public and
breeders about the Biewer as a breed on its own merit with research studies and seminars. It must be
dedicated to preserving the gene pool and furthering the development of the Biewer through strict
guidelines for its breeders and promotion by hosting conformation events, agility & obedience trials and
pet therapy. If and when the Biewer breed does get accepted into AKC at that time the AKC will pick a
club that fulfills all the necessary requirements to be its parent club and not before.
DNA Misconceptions

• The DNA testing profile of a dog is seeing their "genetic makeup" much like a human. Each dog has its
own set of alleles which are unique to them alone. Currently, many different breeds of dogs are able to be
determined by testing of their DNA for breed specific illnesses and even certain breed identification. This
type of mapping is only available to breeds that have a genetic bank to compare against. These breeds are
mainly the accepted purebred dogs that we are accustomed to seeing.
There are many that claim that a Biewer can be proven to be purebred by just this type of DNA testing. So
far, there is no breed specific illness or breed identification that have been traced and followed to be
eligible for this type of testing for our breed. The DNA data profile for the Biewer has still not been
identified as it takes many years and dogs to complete a profile such as this.
So, when you hear that a Biewer can be identified to be purebred by DNA alone, this is very misleading
and totally incorrect. You can check parentage of a puppy by comparing their DNA to their parents and
therefore a claim can be made that this dog is "purebred" if the DNA of the parents match up to the
puppy. This is called DNA Parentage Profiling. The BBCA, in conjunction with the BBIR, Biewer Breed
International Registry, is working with MMI Genomics http://www.mmigenomics.com/products2.
html to build a DNA profile database for the Biewer as each pair of breeding dogs is required to be tested
before breeding and their litter registration occurs.
Biewer Facts & Fictiom
A special Thank You to the BBCA www.biewerbca.org
Imperiales D' Morffiz
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